The Arts Society Rutland
Previous Lectures We will be archiving the lectures as we go through the year, so you can look back on lectures, perhaps look at some of the links associated with them. February 20 Leslie Primo Foreigners in London 1520-1677: The Artists that changed the Course of British Art Why were foreigner painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to native-born English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on English art and art practise? The lecture will look at the various formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period through to the Renaissance and Baroque, looking at their origins and how they came to work in England. It will examine the contributions of artists such as Holbein, Gerrit van Honthorst, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout, Isaac Oliver, Paulus van Somer, van Dyck, Peter Lely, and Rubens. This lecture will look at how these artists influenced the British School of painting and assess their legacy. Short Bibliographic Reading List: Campbell, Caroline, (Ed) Peter Lely: A Lyrical Vision, (The Courtauld Gallery, 2012) Finaldi, Gabriele (Ed), Orazio Gentileschi at the Court of Charles I, (Museo de Bellas Atres de Bilbao, 1999) Foister, Susan, Holbein in England, (Tate Publishing, 2006) Hearn, Karen, Marcus Gheeraerts II Elizabethan Artist: In Focus (Tate Publishing, 2002) Hearn, Karen (Ed), Van Dyck & Britain, (Tate Publishing, 2009) Jaffé, David, with Ede, Minna Moore, Rubens: A Master in the Making, (National Gallery Company Ltd, 2005) Waterhouse, Ellis, Painting in Britain 1530-1790 (Yale University Press, 1994) "The Ambassadors" Holbein 1533 bQEWbLB26MG1LA at Google Cultural Institute January 16 2020 Joanna Banham The Roaring Twenties: Art, Design and High Society Like its name, the Roaring Twenties was a loud and boisterous decade, marked by novelty, modernity and huge social, technological, and economic change. Following the dark days of the Great War, it spawned a generation of wealthy and privileged Bright Young Things who were determined to shock and who broke with the conventions of the past to pursue a life of hedonism and promiscuity, fuelled by an endless round of champagne, cocaine, parties and jazz. Women wore fur coats and cloche hats, donned new boyish fashions and had short, cropped hair. Men drove fast cars, mixed cocktails and smoked American cigarettes. Society ate in new restaurants like The Trocadero, danced the Charleston in ballrooms like the Savoy, and drank in clubs like the Embassy and the Café de Paris. Valentino, Tallulah Bankhead, and Noel Coward emerged as major celebrities through the growing popularity of cinema and the stage. The Roaring Twenties was also a period of enormous vitality in art and design. Fashionable society was immortalised by portraitists like John Lavery and Cecil Beaton who brilliantly captured the glamour of the age. Leisure, pleasure and the excitement of jazz were portrayed in paintings by Burra and Roberts, while the speed of the city and travel were explored in work by McKnight Kauffer and Nevinson. Furniture and decoration showed the influence of Cubism, Vorticism and other styles associated with the avant-garde, while events like the discovery of Tutankhamun’s Tomb ushered in an obsession with all things Egyptian and Oriental. This lecture aims to conjure up the energy and originality of the decade and to explore the lives of its leading figures and examples of its most innovative art and design. Photo: Roaring 20s©Allan Watkin Click here for more information on the 1920s December 19, 2019 Claire Walsh The Christmas Tree: From Forest Fir to Festive Feature The Christmas Tree presents us with over five centuries of art and meaning. Vital to the imagery of both the pagan world and Christianity, its significance emerges in Norse yuletide, ancient Rome and with the early-medieval saints, before its diverse strands were drawn together to symbolize the modern Christmas. It is wrapped in legend, from the Icelandic sagas to St Boniface, from the Mystery Plays to Martin Luther. In art, the forest fir has made the transition from Viking rock carvings to German Romanticism and Scandinavian naturalism, on its way to finding its place as an icon of our modern festival. Decorated and shimmering with light, it has brought Christmas from outside the home into the heart of the family, it has drawn soldiers together across No-Man’s Land, and it continues to symbolize its essential, timeless message of Peace on Earth. The History of Christmas Trees November 21, 2019 Charles Hajdamach Flowers of The Fields: The World of Paperweights Glass paperweights, with their trapped secret interiors, hold a special fascination for everyone whether they are glass enthusiasts or not. This talk outlines their history from their introduction in Venice, to the classical period of French weights from Baccarat, Saint Louis and Clichy in the middle of the 19th century and ending with some of the modern weights from the famous Scottish factory of Caithness. An explanation of how weights are made will reveal the huge technical skills involved in their production. Click here for the Caithness Glass web site Wednesday, 2nd October, 2019 Art and Revolution: Romanovs to Stalin Rosamund Bartlett Before the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace in 1917, Russian artists staged a daring revolution of their own by changing the language of art. Suddenly they became the leaders of the European avant-garde. At the time of the Revolution, some, like Stravinsky, Goncharova and Roerich, chose to remain in emigration, in the hope of one day returning to Russia, while others, like Kandinsky, Chagall and Malevich, went on to play a leading role in early Soviet culture, amidst utopian hopes for a bright future. This lecture will explore the major developments in Russian art in the early revolutionary years. Click here for further information and a booking form. October 17, 2019 Dr. Graham Griffiths Musical Adventures in Russia: In Search of The Snow-Maiden Leokadiya Kashperova For a historian, there can be little to match the excitement of discovering a forgotten treasure. Dr Griffiths’s eventful research across Russia to unveil the Romantic figure of Leokadiya Kashperova (1872-1940), composer and concert pianist (previously known only as ‘Stravinsky’s piano teacher’), offers the perfect example. Kashperova’s re-discovered music establishes her as the earliest-known female Russian composer of international stature. (Rimsky-Korsakov’s affectionate nickname for her was ‘Snow-maiden’.) Kashperova’s lyrical music and Griffiths’s research were selected by BBC Radio 3 and the AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council) for inclusion in their 2018 celebration of ‘Five Forgotten Female Composers’. This presentation offers narrative, images and musical performance at the piano illustrating ‘what it takes’ to recover the life and works of a composer whom History has completely forgotten. Until now. Performance of Leokadiya Kashperova music Wednesday, 25th September, 2019 Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum and A Visit to the “Back to Backs” World class museum in the heart of Birmingham city centre. Click here for the Birmingham Art Gallery web site Carefully restored, atmospheric 19th-century courtyard of working people's houses Click here for the National Trusts Back to Back houses September 19, 2019 Catherine Wallace: Under the Open Sky: Newlyn, Falmouth and Lamorna Artists 1880 - 1940 This lecture gives an overview of art in Cornwall from the late19th century to the start of the Second World War that was created in and around the remote villages of Newlyn and Lamorna in West Cornwall and the port of Falmouth. It begins with the Social Realism of artists such as Walter Langley and Frank Bramley who captured the harshness of life for families in the fishing community of Newlyn. This lecture then looks at the fame that artists such as Stanhope Forbes achieved both at home and abroad in the 1880s and 90s with his depictions of village life and his fascination with capturing low light levels. It also surveys the maritime art of Henry Scott Tuke and Charles Napier Hemy who were based in Falmouth, 28 miles east of Newlyn. Some of the artists created magical fantasies rather than images of stark realism and the colourful Pre-Raphaelite inspired creations of Elizabeth Adela Forbes, Henry Meynell Rheam and Thomas Cooper Gotch are included here. The influence of the Forbes School of painting, which was established in 1899 at Newlyn by Stanhope and his wife Elizabeth, is shown in the work of some of their students such as Dod and Ernest Procter. More information on the Lamorna Artists May 16, 2019 Jonathan Foyle Cathedrals with Particular Mention of Peterborough and Lincoln During the thirteenth century, Lincoln Cathedral was amongst the greatest building projects in England and despite a series of disasters, from an earthquake to war and robbery, we have inherited a magnificent and relatively unscathed masterpiece of art and architecture. Through its sheer size and complexity, the cathedral’s beauty can be difficult to understand. But through writing the book Lincoln Cathedral: Biography of a Great Building the speaker offers a fresh and coherent analysis of the cathedral’s evolution. Peterborough Cathedral web site Lincoln Cathedral web site Wednesday, 10th April, 2019 Visit The Higgins Museum, Bedford and John Bunyan’s house The Higgins Bedford is Bedford's art gallery and museum. It's a place to explore collections of fine & decorative arts, world-class watercolours, local stories and find out about great Bedfordians. Changing exhibitions mean there is always something new to see. Click here for the Higgins Museum web site John Bunyan wrote a book that transformed literature, and inspired people the world over; The Pilgrim’s Progress. Imprisoned for his beliefs, as a prisoner of conscience, his books and personal example helped transform the way ordinary people worshipped, empowering them and their communities. From rural Bedfordshire to world-renown, from pulpit to prison, and from fiery sermons to tales of great beasts and giants – his life and times make for an amazing and colourful story. Click here for the John Bunyan Museum web site. Wednesday, 24th April, 2019 Study Day Women in Art Lynne Gibson This Special Interest Day will be fascinating. It will look at how Traditional Art History has viewed Women in a world where the academic subject has been dominated by men. Stereotypes including the Virgin, (pure wife, loving mother), Venus, (Eve and ‘the fallen woman’) will be explored. Research over the past few decades has changed the subject of Art History as well as the Arts we see on display in Galleries and Museums. Picnic after the Special Interest day. April 18, 2019 Andrew Prince Jewelled Journeys: The Art of Opulent Travel Throughout history, travelling has been used as a way to display wealth, power, status, as well as a useful tool to control over mighty subjects. Today, we take a journey as a matter of course, not thinking much of a distance of a hundred miles or more. In the past it was very different as an Aristocrat had to take not only clothes, but food, furniture, cooking facilities, tents, and the like, not just for himself and family but his household as well. In this talk, Andrew shows the many lavish and opulent accessories and modes of transport that were used by Monarchs and Aristocracy alike, to ease travel while on their seasonal “progress” to and from each others estates, and where diplomatic meetings between Kings turned into a contest of rivals to see who could out do each other in the finest accommodation, jewels, silks, retinue and luggage train. March 21, 2019 Barbara Askew Victoria and Albert: Art and Love This lecture celebrates the 200th Anniversary of the births of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert who were first cousins and born just three months apart in 1819. Their shared enthusiasm for art and music endured throughout the twenty-two years of their marriage and they demonstrated their love through the works of art and jewellery they gave each other for birthdays, Christmases and anniversaries. Victoria and Albert understood and appreciated sculpture more than any of their predecessors since Charles I. They furnished and extended Buckingham Palace, made significant changes to Windsor Castle and commissioned three other royal residences, Balmoral, Sandringham and Osborne – the single most important example of their shared taste. Theirs was a partnership of patronage by a monarch and her consort which is unique in the history of the British monarchy. The wedding of Albert & Victoria February 21, 2019 Rupert Willoughby Threads of History: The World of The Bayeux Tapestry Commissioned by the Bishop of Bayeux who fought at Hastings, executed by skilled English craftsmen, the Bayeux Tapestry is the last survivor of a vanished art form. Rupert Willoughby presents a lively introduction to the tapestry – so much more than the story of Hastings – in which he unravels some of its mysteries, places it in the context of its age and firmly establishes it as a landmark in the history of Western art. With its lively illustrations of languid, party-loving, moustachioed Englishmen, of the cavalcades of noble huntsmen and of the snorting Norman cavalry poised to charge into battle, the Tapestry is the next best thing to a moving picture from the time. A reproduction of the tapestry in HD Bayeux Museum January 17, 2019 Jennifer Toynbee-Holmes Whistler, Wilde and Sargent - The Talent in Tite Street London’s Tite Street was one of the most influential artistic quarters in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A staggering amount of talent thrived in just this one street in Chelsea, including James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde, John Singer Sargent, Robert Brough, Glyn Philpot, Augustus John, Romaine Brooks and Gluck. Throughout its turbulent history it remained home to innumerable artists, writers, suffragettes, queers and madmen. Here Whistler was bankrupted, Oscar Wilde imprisoned and Frank Miles went mad. This lecture ties together the private and professional lives of its inhabitants to form a colourful tapestry of art and intrigue. More information on Tite Street and its inhabitants. London Borough of Chelsea web site
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The Arts Society Rutland