The Arts Society Rutland
Previous Lectures We will be archiving the lectures as we go through the year, so you can look back on lectures, perhaps look at some of the links associated with them. Programme 2017 Thursday 19th October 2017 The Art of the Joke Susie Harries BA (Hons ) M.Litt Artists have always used jokes to make serious statements – about themselves, about the world, about the nature of art. This lecture looks at artists’ jokes through the ages, from medieval monks doodling graffiti in the margins of manuscripts to Banksy turning supermarket walls into social satire. Caravaggio put his own face on Goliath’s severed head as an apology for a racy lifestyle, Michelangelo hid a self- portrait in the Crucifixion of Saint Peter.  When Van Gogh attacked formal art education and Salvador Dali got at Picasso, they did it in paint. Trompe l'oeil, parody, visual puns, the moustache on the Mona Lisa - all in fun, all deadly serious: artists' jokes tell you a lot once you know. Michelangelo’s Crucifixion of the Saint Peter Click here for the article on the above self portrait. VISIT TO LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL and ERASMUS DARWIN HOUSE Wednesday 25th October 2017 Lichfield is the only English Cathedral with three spires built in the heart of the country’s most creative county during the industrial revolution. Explore the stunning Cathedral and discover a rich world of history and architecture. The close is one of the most complete in the country and includes a medieval courtyard which once housed the men of the choir. After a hearty lunch of soup, crusty bread, cake, tea/coffee in the restaurant, we are but a short distance from Erasmus Darwin House. Erasmus Darwin, Grandfather of Charles Darwin, who was one of the foremost physicians of his time, built a network of powerful associates in the industrial revolution. He was one of the founders of ‘The Lunar Society’ whose members included Matthew Boulton, James Watt, Josiah Wedgewood and Josiah Priestley. Click here for the web site of Lichfield Cathedral Click here for the web site for the Erasmus Darwin House Wednesday 4 October 2017 Simon Rees Backstage at the Opera   Opera requires the work of composers, librettists, conductors, directors, designers, wardrobe, wig and prop technicians, as well as orchestra, chorus, soloists, stage crew, and an audience in front of which to perform. Simon Rees has been given access to the photographic collection of his former employers, Welsh National Opera, which illustrate every step of the production process. Opera requires the work of composers, librettists, conductors, directors, designers, wardrobe, wig and prop technicians, as well as orchestra, chorus, soloists, stage crew, and an audience in front of which to perform. Simon Rees has been given access to the photographic collection of his former employers, Welsh National Opera, which illustrate every step of the production process. This lecture traces opera productions from costume designs and set models through to the making of costumes and sets, and rehearsals in the studio and auditorium. Thursday 21st September 2017 Pots and Frocks, the World of Grayson Perry Ian Swankie Widely known for his appearances dressed as his feminine alter ego, Claire, Grayson Perry RA is now a core part of the art establishment. Ten years after winning the Turner Prize he gave the brilliant BBC Reith Lecture in 2013. His works of ceramics, textiles, tapestries and prints are highly sought after. Often controversial, he is able to tackle difficult subjects in a poignant yet witty way. This talk will examine Grayson Perry’s works, his exciting and thought provoking exhibitions, and we’ll look at the character inside the flamboyant frocks. Royal Academy of Art page on Grayson Perry NADFAS interview with Grayson Perry by Judith Quiney 2014 on the Tapestries Exhibition Thursday 15th June 2017 The Sacred Art of Ancient China Jon Cannon Join me to tour the religious art and architecture of  China. We will see examples of work of the great faiths that dominated the history of that great civilisation, including the ancient, indigenous Confucian and Taoist traditions; the image-rich Mahayana version of Buddhism that has been hugely influential in the country for two thousand years; and the distinctive Chinese responses to Christianity and Islam.   At the heart of this rich, and often precociously humanistic culture lay a series of concerns of truly ancient origin: the maintenance of harmonious relations between men and Heaven; respect for one’s family, including the spirits of one's ancestors; and the role of the Emperor as the fulcrum of life in the ‘central Kingdom’, a role as much spiritual as secular. Temple of Heaven, Beijing   Thursday 18th May 2017 How Does Your Garden Grow Mr Shakespeare Caroline Holmes A Shakespeare garden is a themed garden that cultivates plants mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare. In English-speaking countries, particularly the United States, these are often public gardens associated with parks, universities, and Shakespeare festivals. Shakespeare gardens are sites of cultural, educational, and romantic interest and can be locations for outdoor weddings. RHS page on Shakespeare’s plants A list of al the plants mentioned by Shakespeare Thursday 20th April 2017 Faber and Faber, Ninety Years of Excellence in Cover Design Toby Faber MA MBA Since its foundation in 1925, Faber and Faber has built a reputation as one of London’s most important literary publishing houses. Part of that relates to the editorial team that Geoffrey Faber and his successors built around them - TS Eliot was famously an early recruit - but a large part is also due to the firm’s insistence on good design and illustration. This lecture traces the history of Faber and Faber through its illustrations, covers and designs. Early years brought innovations like the Ariel Poems – single poems, beautifully illustrated, sold in their own envelopes. In the 1950s and 1960s, there was an emphasis on typography, led by the firm’s art director Berthold Wolpe; his Albertus font is still used on City of London road signs. In the 1980s, the firm started its association with Pentagram, responsible for the ff logo. Along the way, it has employed some of our most celebrated artists as cover illustrators – from Rex Whistler and Barnett Freedman to Peter Blake and Damien Hirst. Click here to go to the Faber & Faber web site Click here to learn more about the history of Faber Wednesday 29 March 2017  Study Day Roger Mitchell on The Art and Architecture of the American West There will be an exhibition at the Royal Academy The Art of 1930s America which tells the story of a nation in flux. Saturday – Thursday 10am – 6pm Friday 10am – 10pm  Click here for their web site Thursday 16th March 2017 Let There be Light Alexandra Drysdale BA (Hons ) MFA Over 4.6 Billion years ago a star was born and our sun started to shine. Soon after this the Earth and our other planets were formed and light began its eight minute flight to Earth. Science and art have moved forward together in the quest to understand light as can be seen in representations of rainbows or contemporary Black Holes. For artists light can express emotions, from El Greco’s light of spiritual ecstasy to the dangerous darkness of Caravaggio, from Turner’s sublime sunlight to Samuel Palmer’s melancholy moonlight. Australian Impressionism uses a different colour palette to European Impressionism. Stonehenge was built to worship the sun, and today James Turrell makes light temples in art galleries and Dan Flavin makes altarpieces from fluorescent tubes. Let me enlighten you as to how artists have painted temporal and spiritual light through the Ages. James Turrell Deer Enclosure at the YSP Thursday 16th February 2017 Old Buildings : Fakes and Fallacies Philip Venning MA FSA FRSA OBE Historic buildings are often not what they seem, or how we confidently and wrongly believe they ought to look. Were old houses ever built with reused ships’ timbers? Are black and white ‘Tudor’ buildings mainly a 19th century fashion? Is the appearance of many familiar historic castles as much the product of the restorers? How many of the claimed ‘secret tunnels’ from the basement to the docks or church actually exist? As well as examining some of the popular myths about old buildings the lecture will discuss the tricky philosophical issues of authenticity, and the point at which a genuine historic building is so renewed that it effectively becomes a replica. Drawing on examples from throughout the country the lecture will challenge some received wisdom, and offer some surprises. Old building in Caen, France Seven fake houses More fake buildings Doug Gillen proved to be a very popular lecturer in January and I have been asked by several people for the name of the Alternative London Walking Company he works for. It is not his Company, so if you book you may not get Doug, but you could mention his name.    We are hoping to arrange a walk for members in the future. The Alternative London Walking Company’s web site is www.alternativeldn.com or you can e-mail info@alternativeldn.com Doug Gillen Hidden Canvasses: Street Art and the City Street art is visual art created in public locations, usually unsanctioned artwork executed outside of the context of traditional art venues. The term gained popularity during the graffiti art boom of the early 1980s and continues to be applied to subsequent incarnations. Stencil graffiti, wheatpasted poster art or sticker art, and street installation or sculpture are common forms of modern street art. Video projection, yarn bombing and Lock On sculpture became popularised at the turn of the 21st century. The terms "urban art", "guerrilla art", "post-graffiti" and "neo-graffiti" are also sometimes used when referring to artwork created in these contexts.  Traditional spray-painted graffiti artwork itself is often included in this category, excluding territorial graffiti or pure vandalism. Right: More than three meters above east London's Sclater Street is a mural of sprinter Usain Bolt, captured in explosive color by artist James Cochran.  The street artwork, more than four meters high and six meters wide, is a dramatic sight, designed by Cochran to celebrate London's Olympic Games. Background of Street Art ‘Street Art’ exhibition at Tate Modern 2008 The Story Behind Banksy Wheatpaste art posters Deco emerged from the inter war period when rapid industrialisation was transforming culture. One of its major attributes is an embrace of technology. Thursday 21st January 2016 The Elgin Marbles Dr tephen Kershaw BA (Hons) PhD The ‘Elgin Marbles’ is a popular term that in its widest use may refer to the collection of stone objects – sculptures, inscriptions and architectural features – acquired by Lord Elgin during his time as ambassador to the Ottoman court of the Sultan in Istanbul. More specifically, and more usually, it is used to refer to those sculptures, inscriptions and architectural features that he acquired in Athens between 1801 and 1805. These objects were purchased by the British Parliament from Lord Elgin in 1816 and presented by Parliament to the British Museum. Web site created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
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The Arts Society Rutland