The Arts Society Rutland
Programme for 2020/21 All these video-lectures may be changed to sessions in person if social restrictions are lifted, and if our usual venue is available by then. Entry from 1050 for 1100 a.m. start using the Zoom platform Sept 17th 2020 Seventh- Art Productions The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism Please click here for Programme Notes, giving details of the film and it programme. A link to the film will be sent to members the day before. So long as you have been receiving the regular emails about changes you should get the link. If you have not been receiving emails recently from the society please contact Janet Groome on janet2280@googlemail.com so we can add your email address to the mailing. Oct 15th 2020 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Nov 19th 2020 John Ericson Children’s book illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations Dec 17th 2020 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop: The History of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music. Jan 21st 2021 Anne Haworth Phoenix of the Fall: Three Empresses of China In Ancient China, the phoenix, a bird of myth and legend, symbolised the Empress, consort to the Dragon Emperor. The lecture focuses on three Empresses who lived in the Forbidden City from the 18th century to the end of empire in 1911. Empress Xiaoxian was consort to the Qianlong Emperor, one of China’s greatest art collectors. A painting of Empress Xiaoxian The formidable Dowager Empress Cixi ruled the Empire ‘from behind the curtain’ during the 19th century. The Cixi Imperial Dowager Empress Empress Wanrong, known as Elizabeth, married Puyi, the last Emperor of China. She was beautiful and received a Western education yet died an opium addict in wartorn China. Empress Wanrong smoking Their history reaches back to a golden age of art patronage and expansion of the vast Imperial collection, through the opium wars and twilight days of Empire, to the Warlord era of the 20th century, when the art collection was plundered by Palace eunuchs. In this lecture, the phoenix is also the Imperial art collection itself, which was reborn from the ashes of Empire and civil war. After the 1949 Communist victory, Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek and his charismatic Shanghainese wife, Soong May Ling, described as China’s ‘Last Empress’, brought thousands of crates of treasures to Taiwan. The former Imperial collection is now housed in China, Taiwan and in museums and private collections in the West. Feb 18th 2021 Linda Smith Kicking & screaming: a brief story of Post-war British art This lecture explains what has been going on in British art since 1945, when Francis Bacon caused ‘total consternation’ with his raw and visceral canvasses. His work was part of a wider phenomenon called the ‘Geometry of Fear’ by a leading critic of the day. From that point, the talk tracks key moments in British art decade by decade, through the curious mixture of modernism and pastoralism which is associated with the Festival of Britain; on to the explosion of Pop Art and Conceptualism in the 1960s and 70s, through to the 1980s and 90s, which gave us the notorious Sensation exhibition and the Turner Prize, and on to the present day. However, despite all these highly public shocks and upsets, figurative painters like Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud were quietly getting on with it in the background, and one of the great stories of post-war British art is the continuing strength and vigour of that tradition. Click here for the Post War Art background Mar 18th 2021 Nicola Moorby As if by magic: Secrets of Turner’s Watercolours J.M.W. Turner was arguably the greatest practitioner in watercolour the world has ever seen and his achievements still represent the benchmark for artists working today. Yet he left frustratingly few written records of his processes and was notoriously reticent about his methods. One brave soul apparently once asked him the key to being a successful artist and it is recorded that he rather grumpily replied ‘The only secret I have is damned hard work’! This lecture examines Turner’s watercolour practice in detail, unlocking the mysteries behind his exceptional effects. In addition to showcasing the diversity and richness of his achievements in the medium, we will look at his experimental approach to techniques and some of his tools and materials JMW Turner's watercolour, 'Fishmarket on the Sands, Early Morning 1824' Photo: Damobhoy Apr 15th 2021 Rupert Willoughby Basingstoke & its contribution to World Culture One of the most derided towns in England, renowned for its dullness, Basingstoke is distinguished only by its numerous roundabouts and absurd Modernist architecture. Rupert explains that the post-war planners, who inflicted such features as ‘the Great Wall of Basingstoke’ on the town, were politically-motivated and bent on destroying all traces of its past. He reveals the nobler Basingstoke that is buried beneath the concrete, and the few historic gems that have survived the holocaust. Hilariously told, it is a story that neatly illustrates the ugliest episode in England’s architectural history. As Betjeman wrote prophetically, “What goes for Basingstoke goes for most English towns” May 20th 2021 Barbara Askew Happy & Glorious: 1,000 Years of Coronations The crowning of the sovereign is an ancient ceremony rich in religious significance, historical associations and pageantry. This lecture looks at the evolution of the coronation ceremony from Saxon times to that of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. It examines the different stages from the Recognition through to the Homage and explains the significance of the different items of the Coronation Regalia. Finally, the lecture gives an account of the ill omens and memorable mishaps which have occurred at coronations throughout the centuries, and ends with the coronation of Her Majesty the Queen, the first to be genuinely witnessed by the people through the medium of television. June 17th 2021 Mary Rose Rivett-Carnac Art UK: Uncovering the Nation’s Hidden Oil-painting Collection Art UK was set up to catalogue every oil painting in public ownership in the UK. This unique and ambitious project involved visiting 3,000 collections across the country and photographing over 212,000 paintings. These paintings are reproduced in an acclaimed series of hardback catalogues entitled Oil Paintings in Public Ownership. The paintings are freely available to view on the Art UK website (www.artuk.org). The lecture offers an insider’s view of the project and describes some unusual collections visited, intriguing paintings uncovered, detective work involved and assistance given by The Arts Society's members. Sep 16th 2021 Dr. Helen Doe Ships, Men & Women of Nelson’s Navy Some of the untold stories and images of the Napoleonic Wars featuring Nelson's spy, enterprising women and the families left on shore. Oct 21st 2021 Peter Medhurst The Magic Flute: the story of Mozart’s most famous opera The Magic Flute is one of the best loved of all Mozart's operas and charms audiences as much today as it did those at the end of the 18th century. However, beneath the surface of the music are many complexities, ambiguities and hidden secrets, which when revealed may well enhance the listener’s understanding and enjoyment of the work. By following the progress of Tamino - the opera’s hero – Peter Medhurst shows that Mozart’s opera is one of the finest musical products of the enlightenment. Nov 18th 2021 Douglas Skeggs Hockney: A Modern Master From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney's paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site ****************
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2020/21 I am pleased to say that The Arts Society is making lectures available on line. The website is https://www.connected.theartssociety.org. From the menu choose the option "Talks and Lectures" or click on "Lectures at Home" and the current lecture will be shown as available. In these uncertain times we are not sure when we will be back at the Rockingham Hotel so would urge you keep looking at our web site for information and to log on to these lectures and the myriad of other free content from galleries, museums, theatres and opera houses that is available on the web and via You Tube. In the meantime your Committee would like to send you their very best wishes. Stay safe, Ann Lees Membership Sec, TASR a.lees45@btinternet.com 000ooo000 All these video-lectures may be changed to sessions in person if social restrictions are lifted, and if our usual venue is available by then. Entry from 1050 for 1100 a.m. start using the Zoom platform Sept 17th 2020 Seventh- Art Productions The artist’s garden: American Impressionism Please click here for Programme Notes, giving details of the film and it programme. A link to the film will be sent to members the day before. So long as you have been receiving the regular emails about changes you should get the link. If you have not been receiving emails recently from the society please contact Janet Groome on janet2280@googlemail.com so we can add your email address to the mailing. Oct 15th 2020 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaisssance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Nov 19th 2020 John Ericson Children’s book illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations Dec 17th 2020 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop: The History of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music. Jan 21st 2021 Anne Haworth Phoenix of the Fall: Three Empresses of China In Ancient China, the phoenix, a bird of myth and legend, symbolised the Empress, consort to the Dragon Emperor. The lecture focuses on three Empresses who lived in the Forbidden City from the 18th century to the end of empire in 1911. Empress Xiaoxian was consort to the Qianlong Emperor, one of China’s greatest art collectors. A painting of Empress Xiaoxian The formidable Dowager Empress Cixi ruled the Empire ‘from behind the curtain’ during the 19th century. The Cixi Imperial Dowager Empress Empress Wanrong, known as Elizabeth, married Puyi, the last Emperor of China. She was beautiful and received a Western education yet died an opium addict in wartorn China. Empress Wanrong smoking Their history reaches back to a golden age of art patronage and expansion of the vast Imperial collection, through the opium wars and twilight days of Empire, to the Warlord era of the 20th century, when the art collection was plundered by Palace eunuchs. In this lecture, the phoenix is also the Imperial art collection itself, which was reborn from the ashes of Empire and civil war. After the 1949 Communist victory, Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek and his charismatic Shanghainese wife, Soong May Ling, described as China’s ‘Last Empress’, brought thousands of crates of treasures to Taiwan. The former Imperial collection is now housed in China, Taiwan and in museums and private collections in the West. Feb 18th 2021 Linda Smith Kicking & screaming: a brief story of Post-war British art This lecture explains what has been going on in British art since 1945, when Francis Bacon caused ‘total consternation’ with his raw and visceral canvasses. His work was part of a wider phenomenon called the ‘Geometry of Fear’ by a leading critic of the day. From that point, the talk tracks key moments in British art decade by decade, through the curious mixture of modernism and pastoralism which is associated with the Festival of Britain; on to the explosion of Pop Art and Conceptualism in the 1960s and 70s, through to the 1980s and 90s, which gave us the notorious Sensation exhibition and the Turner Prize, and on to the present day. However, despite all these highly public shocks and upsets, figurative painters like Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud were quietly getting on with it in the background, and one of the great stories of post-war British art is the continuing strength and vigour of that tradition. Click here for the Post War Art background Mar 18th 2021 Nicola Moorby As if by magic: Secrets of Turner’s Watercolours J.M.W. Turner was arguably the greatest practitioner in watercolour the world has ever seen and his achievements still represent the benchmark for artists working today. Yet he left frustratingly few written records of his processes and was notoriously reticent about his methods. One brave soul apparently once asked him the key to being a successful artist and it is recorded that he rather grumpily replied ‘The only secret I have is damned hard work’! This lecture examines Turner’s watercolour practice in detail, unlocking the mysteries behind his exceptional effects. In addition to showcasing the diversity and richness of his achievements in the medium, we will look at his experimental approach to techniques and some of his tools and materials JMW Turner's watercolour, 'Fishmarket on the Sands, Early Morning 1824' Photo: Damobhoy Apr 15th 2021 Rupert Willoughby Basingstoke & its contribution to World Culture One of the most derided towns in England, renowned for its dullness, Basingstoke is distinguished only by its numerous roundabouts and absurd Modernist architecture. Rupert explains that the post- war planners, who inflicted such features as ‘the Great Wall of Basingstoke’ on the town, were politically-motivated and bent on destroying all traces of its past. He reveals the nobler Basingstoke that is buried beneath the concrete, and the few historic gems that have survived the holocaust. Hilariously told, it is a story that neatly illustrates the ugliest episode in England’s architectural history. As Betjeman wrote prophetically, “What goes for Basingstoke goes for most English towns” May 20th 2021 Barbara Askew Happy & Glorious: 1,000 Years of Coronations The crowning of the sovereign is an ancient ceremony rich in religious significance, historical associations and pageantry. This lecture looks at the evolution of the coronation ceremony from Saxon times to that of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. It examines the different stages from the Recognition through to the Homage and explains the significance of the different items of the Coronation Regalia. Finally, the lecture gives an account of the ill omens and memorable mishaps which have occurred at coronations throughout the centuries, and ends with the coronation of Her Majesty the Queen, the first to be genuinely witnessed by the people through the medium of television. June 17th 2021 Mary Rose Rivett-Carnac Art UK: Uncovering the Nation’s Hidden Oil-painting Collection Art UK was set up to catalogue every oil painting in public ownership in the UK. This unique and ambitious project involved visiting 3,000 collections across the country and photographing over 212,000 paintings. These paintings are reproduced in an acclaimed series of hardback catalogues entitled Oil Paintings in Public Ownership. The paintings are freely available to view on the Art UK website (www.artuk.org). The lecture offers an insider’s view of the project and describes some unusual collections visited, intriguing paintings uncovered, detective work involved and assistance given by The Arts Society's members. Sep 16th 2021 Dr. Helen Doe Ships, Men & Women of Nelson’s Navy Some of the untold stories and images of the Napoleonic Wars featuring Nelson's spy, enterprising women and the families left on shore. Oct 21st 2021 Peter Medhurst The Magic Flute: the story of Mozart’s most famous opera The Magic Flute is one of the best loved of all Mozart's operas and charms audiences as much today as it did those at the end of the 18th century. However, beneath the surface of the music are many complexities, ambiguities and hidden secrets, which when revealed may well enhance the listener’s understanding and enjoyment of the work. By following the progress of Tamino - the opera’s hero – Peter Medhurst shows that Mozart’s opera is one of the finest musical products of the enlightenment. Nov 18th 2021 Douglas Skeggs Hockney: A Modern Master From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney's paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-
The Arts Society Rutland