The Arts Society Rutland
Programme for 2021 If you have not been receiving email newsletters recently from the society please contact Janet Groome on janet2280@googlemail.com so we can add your email address to the mailing. We will be going back to having lectures from Thursday 16th September at The Rockingham Forest Hotel, Corby, NN17 IQB starting at the usual time of 10.55 for the lecture at eleven. Coffee will be available from 10.15 with Ann ready at the desk to welcome you as you come in and register and I hope you will enjoy meeting up with friends before the talk.  AGM 18th November 2021 10:55 at The Rockingham Forest Hotel Corby Douglas Skeggs Hockney: A Modern Master From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney's paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site This year we have decided to hold a Christmas party at The Falcon Hotel on Thursday 2nd December from 12 – 1.30, open to members and your friends, who will be very welcome and we do hope you will be able to celebrate the end of the extraordinary two years, with getting back to normal with a bit of fun and conversation - plus a few glasses of wine and canapés of course! Details will be sent out later.  2022 Programme 20 January 2022 Julian Richards Inspired by Stonehenge Stonehenge is the most celebrated and sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the British Isles. This lecture explains why Stonehenge must be regarded as architectural in its layout and construction, embodying techniques that for centuries convinced antiquarians that it could not have been built by ‘primitive’ ancient Britons but must be a product of ‘sophisticated’ Romans. We then explore how, over the last two centuries, this iconic structure has inspired painters, potters and poets. Blake, Turner, Constable and Moore are amongst those who have all been drawn to this magnificent ruin, resulting in a diverse catalogue of images and impressions. Finally, we will look at Stonehenge as a global icon and how it’s instantly recognisable stones now grace tea towels in Wiltshire, phone cards in Japan and stamps from Bhutan. 17 February 2022 Barry Venning Giles: His Life, Times and Cartoons The cartoonist, Carl Giles, once said that he loved his creation, Grandma Giles – that fearsome, black-clad, gambling, drinking battleaxe – because she allowed him to say things through his cartoons that he was too polite to say in person. She helped him to poke fun at authority in all its forms, from Hitler to traffic wardens and even his employers at the Daily Express, who didn’t trust him and had sub-editors scouring his cartoons for subversive background details. His admirers included Prince Charles, Sir Malcolm Sargent and Tommy Cooper, and it was no surprise when he was voted Britain’s best-loved cartoonist in 2000. Few people realise, however, that this likeable and humane satirist was also a war correspondent who witnessed the horrors of Belsen, where he found that the camp commandant, Josef Kramer, was also a great fan of his work. Giles gave us a remarkable picture of a half-century of British life. He was also, as his editor John Gordon put it “a spreader of happiness’ and ‘a genius…with the common touch’. 17 March 2022 Tom Flynn The History of Auctions This talk looks at the history of auctions from the Roman period, when the spoils of war were auctioned “Under the Spear,” through to the great book auctions of the sixteenth century and on into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when auctions became the favoured means of disposing of furniture, paintings, works of art and the chattels of the great landed estates. The confidential mechanisms at work in today’s high-priced art auctions are enough to make most reasonable people doubt the ethics of the art market. Are high-end art auctions really public sales or is something else happening behind the scenes? How transparent is the process and why do prices keep rising to such extraordinary heights? Given the prices changing hands, is the art market as well regulated as Wall Street and the City of London, and if not, why not? Are auctions inadvertently contributing to international money-laundering and similar white-collar crime? This stimulating and lavishly illustrated lecture offers the benefits of 35 years writing and reporting on the global art market and its professional practices and tells the inside story of why the world’s most expensive paintings sell for such staggering sums of money. 21 April 2022 Colin Davies Zaha Hadid- Architectural Superstar Dame Zaha Hadid died on March 31 st 2016 at age of 65. Architectural historians of the future will surely recognise her as one of the most important architects of the early 21st century. She was born in Iraq and her reputation was global, but she made Britain her home. This lecture tells the story of her career from the visionary projects of the 1980s, through the years of frustration when her designs were considered unbuildable, to the prolific crop of successful projects built all over the world in the last decade of her life. 19 May 2022 Nicholas Merchant Eileen Gray: An Irish Rebel Imagine, late 19th century Southern Ireland, a young girl of “good family”, living in an 18th century mansion, a tranquil rural existence. It sounds idyllic, the sort of life colour supplements write about with floods of purple prose. This was the life of the subject of this lecture, as the 19th century drew to its close. In 1900 Eileen’s Mother took her to the Exposition Universelle in Paris, and as the saying goes “she never looked back”. An imaginative, and determined girl, Eileen was determined not to see Enniscorthy again. She enrolled in the Slade School of Art, progressed to learn the true art of lacquer in Paris and after the First War became one of Paris’s most recherché and sought-after designers. Not for her the stuffed Victorian furniture of her home but for her, what we now call, “cutting-edge” design. In her studio in the rue Bonaparte she created works which rivalled all the great 20th century furniture makers of Paris. The Art Deco Exhibition of 1925 was the turning point of her life, and the world became aware of her. Ever restless, she built in the late 20’s an extraordinary house at Roquebrunne which became the envy of one of the best- known architects of the period, Le Corbusier. This is a fascinating story of the girl from Enniscorthy, who became one of the most innovative designers of the 20th century. 16 June 2022 Rev. Sarah Lenton All Done on Ginger Beer At the beginning of the last century Lilian Baylis was given sole charge of the Old Vic Theatre, then a Temperance Hall with a coffee shop and ginger beer outlet, and asked to put on suitable entertainments for the local working­-class population. Using the ginger beer crates for scenery, she gave them opera, Shakespeare and, in due course, ballet. In doing so she created the companies for which she is still known: the English National Opera, the Royal National Theatre and The Royal Ballet. This talk charts the achievement of this astonishing and original woman and the household names of the stars of opera, ballet, stage and screen that she drew into her orbit. 15 September 2022 Stella Grace Lyons The Glasgow Boys and their Triumph over the ‘Edinburgh Glue-pots’. During the 19th Century, Glasgow was known as the ‘Second City of the British Empire’. It was a vibrant place, a city which was growing – both industrially and culturally. It was within this innovative environment that the Glasgow Boys were born. The ‘Boys’ were a group of around 20 young artists who revolutionised Scottish painting by bringing it into the mainstream of European art. They carved their own, distinctive path rebelling against the elitist, Edinburgh dominated art scene and the artists they termed the ‘Glue Pots’. This talk explores their diverse, modern and inventive work. 20 October 2022 Nicole Mezey The End of Shadows: Light and the Painter Symbolic, illuminating, awe inspiring – light is a vital tool of the artist. The brooding moods of Rembrandt, the dappled pastures of Constable, the reflections of Impressionism, the symbolism of haloes and divine radiance - all would be impossible without the emotional and physical effects of light. From the gold of medieval altarpieces to photography, techniques and materials capture its rich and subtle possibilities. 17 November 2022 Ian Swankie Thomas Heatherwick- A Modern Leonardo? The past decade has seen the meteoric rise of this extraordinarily versatile British designer with his acclaimed Olympic cauldron, the iconic new London bus and designs for a spectacular new HQ building for Google. Over the last twenty years the Heatherwick Studio has used an intriguing combination of curiosity and experimentation to produce a vast range of solutions to design challenges around the world. This talk looks at the problems presented, and the wonderfully creative ways in which Heatherwick and his team have responded. 19 January 2023 Raymond Warburton Gender and 20th Century British Sculpture: Barbara Hepworth and Elisabeth Frink This lecture explores gender in modern British sculpture through the lives and times of Barbara Hepworth and Elisabeth Frink. Hepworth is often overshadowed by Henry Moore and other male artists, which does a disservice to her work, where she took abstract sculpture to new levels of expressiveness and lyricism. These days her sculptures have a timeless quality to them, where form – and sometimes colour – take centre stage. Born a generation later, Frink ranks alongside Hepworth as a great British sculptor of the 20th century. The subjects for her work were usually birds, horses and men. In fact, she saw men as both heroes and villains, and her sculptures of fallen (male) angels, Greek warriors and a Dying King reflect this point of view. In doing so she was heavily influenced by wartime experiences and memories. She remained steadfastly figurative at a time when most sculptors – including Anthony Caro - embraced abstraction. The lecture argues that Hepworth’s abstract forms are ‘divine’; while Frink looked for the ‘divine’ in human form. During the lecture, there will a discussion of the opportunities and challenges faced by women artists, such as Hepworth and Frink, in an artworld often dominated by men. The lecture will be jargon-free with audience engagement, backed by high quality images. ****************
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2021 If you have not been receiving emails recently from the society please contact Janet Groome on janet2280@googlemail.com so we can add your email address to the mailing. We will be going back to having lectures from Thursday 16th September at The Rockingham Forest Hotel, Corby, NN17 IQB starting at the usual time of 10.55 for the lecture at eleven. Coffee will be available from 10.15 with Ann ready at the desk to welcome you as you come in and register and I hope you will enjoy meeting up with friends before the talk.  AGM 18th November 2021 10:55 at The Rockingham Forest Hotel Corby Douglas Skeggs Hockney: A Modern Master From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney's paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site This year we have decided to hold a Christmas party at The Falcon Hotel on Thursday 2nd December from 12 – 1.30, open to members and your friends, who will be very welcome and we do hope you will be able to celebrate the end of the extraordinary two years, with getting back to normal with a bit of fun and conversation - plus a few glasses of wine and canapés of course! Details will be sent out later.  2022 Programme 20 January 2022 Julian Richards Inspired by Stonehenge Stonehenge is the most celebrated and sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the British Isles. This lecture explains why Stonehenge must be regarded as architectural in its layout and construction, embodying techniques that for centuries convinced antiquarians that it could not have been built by ‘primitive’ ancient Britons but must be a product of ‘sophisticated’ Romans. We then explore how, over the last two centuries, this iconic structure has inspired painters, potters and poets. Blake, Turner, Constable and Moore are amongst those who have all been drawn to this magnificent ruin, resulting in a diverse catalogue of images and impressions. Finally, we will look at Stonehenge as a global icon and how it’s instantly recognisable stones now grace tea towels in Wiltshire, phone cards in Japan and stamps from Bhutan. 17 February 2022 Barry Venning Giles: His Life, Times and Cartoons The cartoonist, Carl Giles, once said that he loved his creation, Grandma Giles – that fearsome, black-clad, gambling, drinking battleaxe – because she allowed him to say things through his cartoons that he was too polite to say in person. She helped him to poke fun at authority in all its forms, from Hitler to traffic wardens and even his employers at the Daily Express, who didn’t trust him and had sub-editors scouring his cartoons for subversive background details. His admirers included Prince Charles, Sir Malcolm Sargent and Tommy Cooper, and it was no surprise when he was voted Britain’s best-loved cartoonist in 2000. Few people realise, however, that this likeable and humane satirist was also a war correspondent who witnessed the horrors of Belsen, where he found that the camp commandant, Josef Kramer, was also a great fan of his work. Giles gave us a remarkable picture of a half-century of British life. He was also, as his editor John Gordon put it “a spreader of happiness’ and ‘a genius…with the common touch’. 17 March 2022 Tom Flynn The History of Auctions This talk looks at the history of auctions from the Roman period, when the spoils of war were auctioned “Under the Spear,” through to the great book auctions of the sixteenth century and on into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when auctions became the favoured means of disposing of furniture, paintings, works of art and the chattels of the great landed estates. The confidential mechanisms at work in today’s high- priced art auctions are enough to make most reasonable people doubt the ethics of the art market. Are high-end art auctions really public sales or is something else happening behind the scenes? How transparent is the process and why do prices keep rising to such extraordinary heights? Given the prices changing hands, is the art market as well regulated as Wall Street and the City of London, and if not, why not? Are auctions inadvertently contributing to international money-laundering and similar white-collar crime? This stimulating and lavishly illustrated lecture offers the benefits of 35 years writing and reporting on the global art market and its professional practices and tells the inside story of why the world’s most expensive paintings sell for such staggering sums of money. 21 April 2022 Colin Davies Zaha Hadid- Architectural Superstar Dame Zaha Hadid died on March 31 st 2016 at age of 65. Architectural historians of the future will surely recognise her as one of the most important architects of the early 21st century. She was born in Iraq and her reputation was global, but she made Britain her home. This lecture tells the story of her career from the visionary projects of the 1980s, through the years of frustration when her designs were considered unbuildable, to the prolific crop of successful projects built all over the world in the last decade of her life. 19 May 2022 Nicholas Merchant Eileen Gray: An Irish Rebel Imagine, late 19th century Southern Ireland, a young girl of “good family”, living in an 18th century mansion, a tranquil rural existence. It sounds idyllic, the sort of life colour supplements write about with floods of purple prose. This was the life of the subject of this lecture, as the 19th century drew to its close. In 1900 Eileen’s Mother took her to the Exposition Universelle in Paris, and as the saying goes “she never looked back”. An imaginative, and determined girl, Eileen was determined not to see Enniscorthy again. She enrolled in the Slade School of Art, progressed to learn the true art of lacquer in Paris and after the First War became one of Paris’s most recherché and sought-after designers. Not for her the stuffed Victorian furniture of her home but for her, what we now call, “cutting-edge” design. In her studio in the rue Bonaparte she created works which rivalled all the great 20th century furniture makers of Paris. The Art Deco Exhibition of 1925 was the turning point of her life, and the world became aware of her. Ever restless, she built in the late 20’s an extraordinary house at Roquebrunne which became the envy of one of the best- known architects of the period, Le Corbusier. This is a fascinating story of the girl from Enniscorthy, who became one of the most innovative designers of the 20th century. 16 June 2022 Rev. Sarah Lenton All Done on Ginger Beer At the beginning of the last century Lilian Baylis was given sole charge of the Old Vic Theatre, then a Temperance Hall with a coffee shop and ginger beer outlet, and asked to put on suitable entertainments for the local working­-class population. Using the ginger beer crates for scenery, she gave them opera, Shakespeare and, in due course, ballet. In doing so she created the companies for which she is still known: the English National Opera, the Royal National Theatre and The Royal Ballet. This talk charts the achievement of this astonishing and original woman and the household names of the stars of opera, ballet, stage and screen that she drew into her orbit. 15 September 2022 Stella Grace Lyons The Glasgow Boys and their Triumph over the ‘Edinburgh Glue-pots’. During the 19th Century, Glasgow was known as the ‘Second City of the British Empire’. It was a vibrant place, a city which was growing – both industrially and culturally. It was within this innovative environment that the Glasgow Boys were born. The ‘Boys’ were a group of around 20 young artists who revolutionised Scottish painting by bringing it into the mainstream of European art. They carved their own, distinctive path rebelling against the elitist, Edinburgh dominated art scene and the artists they termed the ‘Glue Pots’. This talk explores their diverse, modern and inventive work. 20 October 2022 Nicole Mezey The End of Shadows: Light and the Painter Symbolic, illuminating, awe inspiring – light is a vital tool of the artist. The brooding moods of Rembrandt, the dappled pastures of Constable, the reflections of Impressionism, the symbolism of haloes and divine radiance - all would be impossible without the emotional and physical effects of light. From the gold of medieval altarpieces to photography, techniques and materials capture its rich and subtle possibilities. 17 November 2022 Ian Swankie Thomas Heatherwick- A Modern Leonardo? The past decade has seen the meteoric rise of this extraordinarily versatile British designer with his acclaimed Olympic cauldron, the iconic new London bus and designs for a spectacular new HQ building for Google. Over the last twenty years the Heatherwick Studio has used an intriguing combination of curiosity and experimentation to produce a vast range of solutions to design challenges around the world. This talk looks at the problems presented, and the wonderfully creative ways in which Heatherwick and his team have responded. ****************
The Arts Society Rutland