The Arts Society Rutland
Programme February 20 Leslie Primo Foreigners in London 1520-1677: The Artists that changed the Course of British Art Why were foreigner painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to native-born English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on English art and art practise? The lecture will look at the various formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period through to the Renaissance and Baroque, looking at their origins and how they came to work in England. It will examine the contributions of artists such as Holbein, Gerrit van Honthorst, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout, Isaac Oliver, Paulus van Somer, van Dyck, Peter Lely, and Rubens. This lecture will look at how these artists influenced the British School of painting and assess their legacy. Short Bibliographic Reading List: Campbell, Caroline, (Ed) Peter Lely: A Lyrical Vision, (The Courtauld Gallery, 2012) Finaldi, Gabriele (Ed), Orazio Gentileschi at the Court of Charles I, (Museo de Bellas Atres de Bilbao, 1999) Foister, Susan, Holbein in England, (Tate Publishing, 2006) Hearn, Karen, Marcus Gheeraerts II Elizabethan Artist: In Focus (Tate Publishing, 2002) Hearn, Karen (Ed), Van Dyck & Britain, (Tate Publishing, 2009) Jaffé, David, with Ede, Minna Moore, Rubens: A Master in the Making, (National Gallery Company Ltd, 2005) Waterhouse, Ellis, Painting in Britain 1530-1790 (Yale University Press, 1994) "The Ambassadors" Holbein 1533 bQEWbLB26MG1LA at Google Cultural Institute March 19 Linda Smith Kicking and Screaming: A Brief Story of Post-War British Art This lecture explains what has been going on in British art since 1945, when Francis Bacon caused ‘total consternation’ with his raw and visceral canvasses. His work was part of a wider phenomenon called the ‘Geometry of Fear’ by a leading critic of the day. From that point, the talk tracks key moments in British art decade by decade, through the curious mixture of modernism and pastoralism which is associated with the Festival of Britain; on to the explosion of Pop Art and Conceptualism in the 1960s and 70s, through to the 1980s and 90s, which gave us the notorious Sensation exhibition and the Turner Prize, and on to the present day. However, despite all these highly public shocks and upsets, figurative painters like Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud were quietly getting on with it in the background, and one of the great stories of post-war British art is the continuing strength and vigour of that tradition. Click here for the Tate web site on Post War British Art April 16 Douglas Skeggs David Hockney: The Old Master of Modern Art From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney’s paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid-eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site May 21 Julian Richards Inspired by Stonehenge Stonehenge is the most celebrated and sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the British Isles. This lecture explains why Stonehenge must be regarded as architectural in its layout and construction, embodying techniques that for centuries convinced antiquarians that it could not have been built by ‘primitive’ ancient Britons but must be a product of ‘sophisticated’ Romans. We then explore how, over the last two centuries, this iconic structure has inspired painters, potters and poets. Blake, Turner, Constable and Moore are amongst those who have all been drawn to this magnificent ruin, resulting in a diverse catalogue of images and impressions. Finally, we will look at Stonehenge as a global icon and how it’s instantly recognisable stones now grace tea towels in Wiltshire, phone cards in Japan and stamps from Bhutan. Stonehenge with farm carts, c. 1885 unrestored image Click here for the English Heritage web site on Stonehenge. September 17 Malcolm Kenwood Fakes and Forgeries: The Art of Deception: Insight into the Methods used by Criminals to Dupe the Art Market The question of fake decorative art has been in vogue for hundreds of years, however increasingly sophisticated methods are being used by criminals to generate vast profits. This lecture reveals actual case studies, demonstrating the lengths forgers will go to in passing off works as legitimate. Skilled forgers capable of imitating well known artists have provided the ability to dupe many at the highest level within the art market. Experts have estimated that a high percentage of all works within the art market are fake. These scams ultimately inflict considerable damage to collectors and the trade. Click here for more on the history of Art Forgery. October 15 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Self-portrait of Raphael, aged approximately 23 Click here for the National Gallery web site on Raphael November 19 John Ericson Children’s Book Illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations December 17 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop; a history of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music.
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2019 February 20 Leslie Primo Foreigners in London 1520-1677: The Artists that changed the Course of British Art Why were foreigner painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to native-born English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on English art and art practise? The lecture will look at the various formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period through to the Renaissance and Baroque, looking at their origins and how they came to work in England. It will examine the contributions of artists such as Holbein, Gerrit van Honthorst, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout, Isaac Oliver, Paulus van Somer, van Dyck, Peter Lely, and Rubens. This lecture will look at how these artists influenced the British School of painting and assess their legacy. Short Bibliographic Reading List: Campbell, Caroline, (Ed) Peter Lely: A Lyrical Vision, (The Courtauld Gallery, 2012) Finaldi, Gabriele (Ed), Orazio Gentileschi at the Court of Charles I, (Museo de Bellas Atres de Bilbao, 1999) Foister, Susan, Holbein in England, (Tate Publishing, 2006) Hearn, Karen, Marcus Gheeraerts II Elizabethan Artist: In Focus (Tate Publishing, 2002) Hearn, Karen (Ed), Van Dyck & Britain, (Tate Publishing, 2009) Jaffé, David, with Ede, Minna Moore, Rubens: A Master in the Making, (National Gallery Company Ltd, 2005) Waterhouse, Ellis, Painting in Britain 1530-1790 (Yale University Press, 1994) "The Ambassadors" Holbein 1533 bQEWbLB26MG1LA at Google Cultural Institute March 19 Linda Smith Kicking and Screaming: A Brief Story of Post-War British Art This lecture explains what has been going on in British art since 1945, when Francis Bacon caused ‘total consternation’ with his raw and visceral canvasses. His work was part of a wider phenomenon called the ‘Geometry of Fear’ by a leading critic of the day. From that point, the talk tracks key moments in British art decade by decade, through the curious mixture of modernism and pastoralism which is associated with the Festival of Britain; on to the explosion of Pop Art and Conceptualism in the 1960s and 70s, through to the 1980s and 90s, which gave us the notorious Sensation exhibition and the Turner Prize, and on to the present day. However, despite all these highly public shocks and upsets, figurative painters like Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud were quietly getting on with it in the background, and one of the great stories of post-war British art is the continuing strength and vigour of that tradition. Click here for the Tate web site on Post War British Art April 16 Douglas Skeggs David Hockney: The Old Master of Modern Art From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney’s paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid-eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site May 21 Julian Richards Inspired by Stonehenge Stonehenge is the most celebrated and sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the British Isles. This lecture explains why Stonehenge must be regarded as architectural in its layout and construction, embodying techniques that for centuries convinced antiquarians that it could not have been built by ‘primitive’ ancient Britons but must be a product of ‘sophisticated’ Romans. We then explore how, over the last two centuries, this iconic structure has inspired painters, potters and poets. Blake, Turner, Constable and Moore are amongst those who have all been drawn to this magnificent ruin, resulting in a diverse catalogue of images and impressions. Finally, we will look at Stonehenge as a global icon and how it’s instantly recognisable stones now grace tea towels in Wiltshire, phone cards in Japan and stamps from Bhutan. Stonehenge with farm carts, c. 1885 unrestored image Click here for the English Heritage web site on Stonehenge. September 17 Malcom Kenwood Fakes and Forgeries: The Art of Deception: Insight into the Methods used by Criminals to Dupe the Art Market The question of fake decorative art has been in vogue for hundreds of years, however increasingly sophisticated methods are being used by criminals to generate vast profits. This lecture reveals actual case studies, demonstrating the lengths forgers will go to in passing off works as legitimate. Skilled forgers capable of imitating well known artists have provided the ability to dupe many at the highest level within the art market. Experts have estimated that a high percentage of all works within the art market are fake. These scams ultimately inflict considerable damage to collectors and the trade. Click here for more on the history of Art Forgery. October 15 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Self-portrait of Raphael, aged approximately 23 Click here for the National Gallery web site on Raphael November 19 John Ericson Children’s Book Illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations December 17 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop; a history of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music.
The Arts Society Rutland