The Arts Society Rutland
Programme for 2020 MESSAGE TO ALL MEMBERS The Arts Society Rutland committee we have decided to postpone or cancel our programme of lectures for the rest of the spring/summer 2020, and hope to resume in the Autumn. We will continue to monitor the situation with regard to the future lectures. Please keep checking back with this web site for the latest news. September 17 Malcolm Kenwood Fakes and Forgeries: The Art of Deception: Insight into the Methods used by Criminals to Dupe the Art Market The question of fake decorative art has been in vogue for hundreds of years, however increasingly sophisticated methods are being used by criminals to generate vast profits. This lecture reveals actual case studies, demonstrating the lengths forgers will go to in passing off works as legitimate. Skilled forgers capable of imitating well known artists have provided the ability to dupe many at the highest level within the art market. Experts have estimated that a high percentage of all works within the art market are fake. These scams ultimately inflict considerable damage to collectors and the trade. Click here for more on the history of Art Forgery. October 15 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Self-portrait of Raphael, aged approximately 23 Click here for the National Gallery web site on Raphael November 19 John Ericson Children’s Book Illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations December 17 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop; a history of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music.
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2020 MESSAGE TO ALL MEMBERS The Arts Society Rutland committee we have decided to postpone or cancel our programme of lectures for the rest of the spring/summer 2020, and hope to resume in the Autumn. We will continue to monitor the situation with regard to the future lectures. Please keep checking back with this web site for the latest news. Please click here for a letter from our President and Chairman, Gay Woodley. September 17 Malcom Kenwood Fakes and Forgeries: The Art of Deception: Insight into the Methods used by Criminals to Dupe the Art Market The question of fake decorative art has been in vogue for hundreds of years, however increasingly sophisticated methods are being used by criminals to generate vast profits. This lecture reveals actual case studies, demonstrating the lengths forgers will go to in passing off works as legitimate. Skilled forgers capable of imitating well known artists have provided the ability to dupe many at the highest level within the art market. Experts have estimated that a high percentage of all works within the art market are fake. These scams ultimately inflict considerable damage to collectors and the trade. Click here for more on the history of Art Forgery. October 15 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Self-portrait of Raphael, aged approximately 23 Click here for the National Gallery web site on Raphael November 19 John Ericson Children’s Book Illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations December 17 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop; a history of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music.
The Arts Society Rutland