The Arts Society Rutland
Kicking and Screaming: A Brief Story of Post-War British Art However we hope to have Linda back at a later date to deliver this lecture. We will continue to monitor the situation with regard to the future lectures. Please keep checking back with this web site for the latest news. April 16 Douglas Skeggs David Hockney: The Old Master of Modern Art From the early sixties, when he left the Royal College of Art more famous than his teachers, Hockney’s paintings have shown a charm and humour that sets them apart from others of his generation. A naturally gifted draftsman, his love of ingenious visual devices has led him to experiment with a whole range of techniques, from stage design to coloured paper making. From the early abstract expressionist images, through his famous Californian scenes of swimming pools to the photo-montages of the mid-eighties, this lecture follows the career of an artist whose wit and imagination has never faltered. Click here for David Hockney’s own web site Exhibition: David Hockney : Drawing from Life is on at The National Portrait Gallery London from 27th February - 28th June. We will continue to monitor the situation with regard to the future lectures. Please keep checking back with this web site for the latest news. May 21 Julian Richards Inspired by Stonehenge Stonehenge is the most celebrated and sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the British Isles. This lecture explains why Stonehenge must be regarded as architectural in its layout and construction, embodying techniques that for centuries convinced antiquarians that it could not have been built by ‘primitive’ ancient Britons but must be a product of ‘sophisticated’ Romans. We then explore how, over the last two centuries, this iconic structure has inspired painters, potters and poets. Blake, Turner, Constable and Moore are amongst those who have all been drawn to this magnificent ruin, resulting in a diverse catalogue of images and impressions. Finally, we will look at Stonehenge as a global icon and how it’s instantly recognisable stones now grace tea towels in Wiltshire, phone cards in Japan and stamps from Bhutan. Stonehenge with farm carts, c. 1885 unrestored image Click here for the English Heritage web site on Stonehenge.
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October 15 Jo Walton Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. (He was also charming, handsome and polite – which couldn’t be said for all Renaissance polymaths.) This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists. Self-portrait of Raphael, aged approximately 23 Click here for the National Gallery web site on Raphael November 19 John Ericson Children’s Book Illustrations As adults we carry in our heads huge numbers of images from childhood, and some of those most deeply etched come from illustrations in books that we read as children. Images of ‘Tigger’ and ‘Toad’ or even ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ will probably remain with us for ever! In addition to a wide range of examples John will examine how illustrations contribute to the development of understanding and how the interaction of image and narrative creates such powerful memories. Click here to see the 10 most iconic children’s book illustrations December 17 Roger Askew From Pageant to Pop; a history of Music in London With its six world-class orchestras, two opera houses and abundant venues and events, and a major centre of popular music, London can be called the musical capital of the world. This lecture explores how the city developed its wonderful traditions of public music from the 16th century to the present day; from royal court and coffee house to concert hall and rock stage. The story involves many colourful individuals, Purcell, Handel and Elgar among them,who have left their mark on the musical life of the city. This lecture, richly illustrated with musical examples, also explores how many of our national institutions are inextricably linked to some of the greatest music.
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The Arts Society Rutland